VISITORS' Comments

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Solstice 2012................... Two views (scroll down for earlier years' comments)

From :
Lucinda

I am speaking to a friend on Facebook who is heartbroken that she went there with utter love and respect for the site and that the whole Summer Solstice event was full of drunk party goers and those that had gone in a respectful, loving way were made to sit on the outside, so as not to be disturbed by the revellers.
I was there myself at a private ceremony on the 11th June and Security were very strict with us. We were told not to even touch the stones because of the acid in our hands.
Why oh why do you allow drunk, disrespectful people into such a sacred site? And this happened last year too I hear.
Please elaborate as this is horrific behaviour and I can’t see how you care for Stonehenge at all. This would NOT happen at the Natural History Museum or the V&A.
Yours incredibly disappointedly,
Lucinda
( It happens every year and we asked Lucinda to write to English Heritage, the custodians of the whole site. This she has done, to the Chief Executive, so please let us know the tenor of the reply.)

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From : Molly

People missioned from all over the country, wading through mud and terrential downpour to be part of this year's summer solstice celebrations. The atmosphere was enchanting as people danced around the stones and pagans and druids played rhythmic percussion to celebrate the longest day of the year. Spirits were high despite the soggy conditions and festival goers held no hindrance to clamber and slide their way around the muddy stones.
As it got light the magical atmosphere lifted and when the time struck 4:50 everyone watched eagerly accross the fields waiting for the sun to mark their celebration. Mist and cloud overhung the ancient stones making it impossible to see the sunrise, however morale remained high as druids blew horns and thousands of people cheered to welcome the solstice.
The site was well equipt with food and toilet services as well as a safety deposit area for luggage which many people found a massive help after a long journey. Entrants to the site also got provided with make-shift rain macks which was recieved greatfully by the drenched travellers who continued to make the best out of the rainstorm. Festival workers helped keep the site safe by providing glass bottle bins on entry and stewards patrolled with rubbish bags to help maintain cleanliness and pay respect to the ancient stones. Despite the rainy conditions, this year’s summer solstice was a magical experience and all that attended said they would definitely be bringing their wellies and rainmacks for the 2013 celebrations!
Thank You, Molly

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From : Barry

My theory on why Stonehenge was built is that it was used as a giant compass for navigational purposes? Wandering off into the countryside and getting lost with no means of getting home would have definitely been a common occurrence in those days, anybody that goes fell walking will vouch for that, as its so easy to get lost as one valley looks very much like another! They would then use marker posts some distance from the Henge and align their direction of travel just like a gun sight. Using stone markers and aligning them with each other would have meant it was possible to travel the full length of the country and get back safely. As an early solution to this problem they will have built temporary structures made out of wood while whoever was Prime Minister at the time (Probably Thatcher?) will have had a more permanent structure commissioned. I bet they never envisaged it lasting as long as it did!

Barry Neville.


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From : Brian

Feel free to put it up if you like, Alan.  I'm used to it!  Some 
people feel seriously threatened by the things I say, but that always was the way.  Maybe I will post a comment myself, asking ever so 
gently what "real scientific evidence" he might be referring 
to............
Best wishes
Brian

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From : Neil, responding to Brian's article in 'News and Events' - Two great hoaxes: Piltdown Skull and Bluestone Quarry?
(Incidentally, I asked Brian if it was Ok to post this up, as it is a tad raw. See above)

Greetings Folks,
Brian does not recognise real scientific evidence, it appears his
lunatic fringe ideas are among the worst. Try harder mate, get real.

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From : Thomas

after watching a story recently on Stonehenge, i began to wonder that maybe Stonehenge was not a clock or even a temple but a monument dedicated to the coming of someone after its time or maybe even to a king.Now I'm no geologist or even a college professor but i am a construction freak.I do agree that it may be a clock but not for telling time but for maybe telling a specific time.


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From : Paul and Jo

what a day..jo and i stopped at a small b and b in bathford over the new year  and visited stonehenge on new years day....fantastic is to only way to describe it. in all perfect way to start the new year ... many thanks to beth at the garston and all staff at stonehenge.... top class.. paul and jo..


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From : Brian (see also below)

History of Stonehenge
The Second Stage
http://www.stonehenge.co.uk/history.php
Quote:
"The second and most dramatic stage of Stonehenge started around 2150  BC. Some 82 bluestones from the Preseli mountains, in south-west Wales  were transported to the site. It is thought these stones, some weighing 4 tonnes each were dragged on rollers and sledges to the headwaters on Milford Haven and then loaded onto rafts. They were carried by water along the south coast of Wales and up the rivers Avon  and Frome, before being dragged overland again to near Warminster in Wiltshire. The final stage of the journey was mainly by water, down  the river Wylye to Salisbury, then the Salisbury Avon to west Amesbury.

This astonishing journey covers nearly 240 miles. Once at the site, 
these stones were set up in the centre to form an incomplete double 
circle. .........."

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Hi folks

Can I remind you that even if you are here reproducing the "orthodoxy"  about the bluestones, what you say is totally unsupported by the  evidence?  There is no evidence that there were 82 bluestones.  They did not all come from the Preseli Hills -- they came from at least 20  different sites.  There is no evidence at all that there was any long- distance human transport.  This is all speculation, started by HH Thomas, encouraged further by Atkinson, and uncritically accepted as "the truth" ever since, by generations of archaeologists who seem to be incapable of critical thought.

Please have a look at the following:
http://www.earthmagazine.org/earth/article/1a1-7d8-c-1f

My short YouTube video called "The Stonehenge Conspiracy"
http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=FvjyYpF1ui8

My web pages dealing with the bluestone controversy:
http://www.brianjohn.f2s.com/enigma1.html
http://www.brianjohn.f2s.com/bluestonesimp58.html

You may not want to believe me, but at least you can revise your web 
site to take account of modern evidence!

With best wishes

Brian


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From : Brian

Hi folks -- nice site! Well done. Just one thing -- on your section about the building of Stonehenge you repeat the old 1921 myth about the bluestones having been transported all the way from Wales by our Neolithic ancestors. There never was a scrap of evidence in support of that theory, and it was based originally on a misunderstanding of the glacial history of the British Isles. We now know that the glacier that crossed Pembrokeshire reached at least as far east as Glastonbury, and probably further. The bluestones are glacial erratics, laid down in a trail somewhere to the west of Stonehenge. Because they were in a trail, they were easy to find -- so the Stonehenge builders gathered them all up until they were all gone. New geological work also disproves the human transport theory. The bluestones did not all come from one place, but from at least 15 different locations, some of which have still not been identified. It stretches credibility beyond all reasonable limits to say that the Neolithic tribesmen wandered about all over West Wales, and even up into the Brecon Beacons, just to gather up a motley collection of stones for hauling over land and sea and then for incorporating into the "Stonehenge Project." Change the words on the site, please.... 

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From : Bovey Tracey Meditation Group

August 10th, just returned from visit to the circle, and was very impressed by the way we were greeted and shown where to park by the security people. Also we were impressed by them as they were in the background and let us get on with our visit, which was awesome and inspiring and thoroughly enjoyed by all the members of the group. We were left with an everlasting experience which we hope to repeat again in the future. We concluded our visit with a trip to Friar Tuck Cafe in Amesbury and enjoyed a well earned breakfast which was extremely good and filling. Many thanks to Stonehenge and the ancient ancestors. 

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From : Christian Matthews

Ladies and Gentlemen, I have visited Avebury Circle and have seen Stonehenge. I have seen many programs and re-enactments and dramatizations of the religious rituals and rites performed at or for the sites. They all seem to say that circles and observatory's were places of worship. They all make the assertion that these primitive peoples could only be united to form these great structures in reverence to a deity. That is a pretty large assertion to project and scientifically speaking is void of of a whole approach to answers. If there is one thing that all mammals have in common, it is play and competition - not religion. From the bears, to rams, to chimps, to dolphins, to humans we all compete through either wrestling, racing, chasing, wagering, and challenging. It is obtuse to assume that the pre-historic Homo Sapiens worshiped unexplained gods. Their brains were no smaller than ours and they would have every capacity, curiousness and vanity we exercise. To assume that these structures could only be devised as means to nirvana is only half right. Nirvana is where you go in a state of bliss. You usually need some sense of expectation and exaltation to achieve this emotional high, but religion is not the only place you can receive this. Just take one example although there are 1000's: Imagine the Indy 500? Hundreds of thousands of people from all around the world gather once a year at the same time every year to celebrate. There is music and commerce and socialization. There are qualifiers. Timed laps. Obstacles. There is trade. There are memorials and museums. There are heroes. There is drink. There is dancing. Feasts even. Talisman. Leagues. There are champions. There are sponsors and teams representing corporate culture and spirited fans. There is a tower of advantage and a conclusion ceremony. There is a course - Indy is called the "Brickyard." A to B over and over again - like the stars in the heavens. Whether it be Aztec Basketball, Paintball, snowball fights, 200 mph, war, darts, a 1000 Meter relay, football, horse racing, elections or cribbage; we love to compete and we celebrate it. We enjoy skirting the edge of possibly making fool out of ourselves or even dying - Public speaking is the number one fear. It is much easier to perform a ritual that is constant, moderately predictable(has rules) and that embraces drama and it's pinnacles with open conclusions then it is to begin a discourse about man's better nature and his or her relationship with god. The soul tends to enjoy the ritual even without the enlightenment. Nobody's wins when you play Monopoly either but there it is. The emotional triumph or high is eclipsing or conquering of fear by celebration in victory or performance. Key word eclipse. Religion and sport, the stock market, are illusions of control. Human beings seek that illusion constantly. Most modern occupations are designed to collect pieces of paper. To assume that "primitive" culture is as desperate as the modern for answers is not enough. We seek relief from the questions more than we seek the bigger picture answers. It is my rough estimation that Avebury Circle and Stonehenge would more likely be sporting venues then houses of god. It's nice to think of the builders of these monuments as being spiritually seeking enlightenment, sage like and wonderfully pensive. It would be nice to think of the modern world in such a way. But religious morality, bullshit and arcane laws tend to pile on after an age or 2, and the complicated muddle we are currently absorbed into shouldn't be the rational formula for describing previous culture's "quest." Like anyone our quests or occupations are designed more often alleviate than elevate.  

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2 From : "Lorelai"

2. - Hi again,
Now I did find the map where Stonehenge I placed and
I strongly believe that its real place is in the map that I'll show below. The stones I'll think where brought there from somewhere in south-east and the ones that put them there missed the cape at the south of England so the people did think the where in Ireland?!
I all sow think that's why the "blue" stones was put there, (I read
somewhere that they came from Ireland) It's because the strength of Stonehenge would get stronger when it's real elements where put there after the harm was done. But it's still powerful anyway by standing in England. But I'll think it would be even stronger in Ireland.

1. - Hi everyone or someone! I have started a journey that only goes by my feelings inside and... Now I have this strong feeling regarding where I have lived in my past life. And it is in Ireland at 1300 century (I'll think), anyway I have all sow a strong feeling Regarding the Stonehenge (never been there) I feel it's in the wrong place in some how? I don't really know but I feel that its birthplace is in the west coast of Ireland. And all the magic that you can get from the place are gone when so many people are there in an un-respectful visit to the Stonehenge. I believe that you can come to Stonehenge to be thankful for all the things that the earth have provided to you , and you don't need to be there in a special date in the year if you are really true whit your feelings, I believe that the earth will listen to your feelings. And what Stonehenge it's form as, I'll think the round circle is the earth, the middle some kind of the people and buildings on it, and the two stones a little bit away from the circle could be the great sun and the moon. Well this is joust my strong feeling I have inside me by looking at it, and as I said I'm just in my beginning of my search for why am I here today and why I have this strong feelings inside and strong belief that I could make a big difference for a lot of people and the earth by talking about my feelings and beliefs. By this I'll hope someone response me, if you dislike what I feel or if you agree or if you just could help me whit my search for some answers. BB

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From : Arnstein Mjelde

I have a theory in how to move massive stones 30 miles on various sorts of grounds. Stonehenge is just a tribute to new engineering, as You know the actual Stonehenge is formed as a wheel. Place a big stone on a sledge; mount in a big wheel with rail support on both sides?. The sledge will always skid. If, probably not, there is a hub, you have a great arm to move heavy loads, the sledge will always skid to the lowest point. Most likely they used ropes to pull the wheel from the top point of the wheel and the sledge skids to the bottom of the wheel. It seems likely to fit with the ?highway? that was build in the area. Stonehenge and the other circular of wood some 40 miles away, or? Represent the new engineering, and the sun, as always turning, is therefore centered in this monument. 

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From : Faron Scott (Melksham, Wiltshire)

This was my second Solstice at Stonehenge and I think that almost everything I said in my last 'review' stands true this time, apart from the weather. In 2005, the sun was visible at 4.58am and was met with cheers and whistles and the customary blowing of horns. In 2006, however, we had cloud, rain and wind to contend with. It wasn't until 5.58am that the clouds finally moved aside and gave us the sunshine that we were all waiting for. There were slightly fewer in number present for the celebrations, due to the inclement conditions that befell this year's longest day. Rain fell regularly through the night, but this did nothing to dampen the spirits of most of those who attended. Due to the late arrival of the sun that morning, a larger group was gathered in the stone circle for music and dancing. Many different instruments were to be heard and everyone was definitely in high sprits as the sky suddenly became blue and the rain clouds all but disappeared. The only thing that spoiled the celebrations was the reluctance of some people to leave the stone circle at 9am and then to see a line of security staff having to almost physically remove people. That aside, it was another unforgettable experience and I shall definitely be returning in 2007! I have some more pictures that I hope have captured the spirit of the Solstice. 

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From : Carl M. Ring and Jonathan Ring (son) Stockholm

Dear Stonehengists, I have at numerous occasions had the task to move heavy objects. In this, I have used an A-frame, that I think also egyptians used to move heavy stones. Grease under sledges most certainly was to costly, because this mainly served for other purposes. So, I strongly believe that the A-frame is an efficient and transportable tool. The A- frame could be made from tree trunks with length of max. 20m. From this fact you can calculate how long each movement could be. The arc of course relates to the stretching of the rope. There are tables showing this. Out of this , it should be possible to calculate day/ton/meter. By experience, I know that with good technique and skills you may make substantial moves in short time. In the A-frame you can also make a lever or cantilever to increase the efficiency by up to 50%. You get a kind of double lever. The arc then prolongs. To transport stones over water, we have experienced lifting and transporting under water instead, using the A-frame again for lifting stone into place. I have been a construction designer, shipbuilder and rigger for a long time and to me hauling out ships, raising rigs and other heavy work comes as a natural part of the job. I would be pleased to hear your comment. I am discussing this now with my eleven year boy who is watching national geographic- earth investigated with great interest.

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From : Di

Good Day, I just read the comments from Nicola on your Visitors Forum & would also like to comment :

I attended the 2007 Summer Solstice at Stonehenge, having travelled specifically from South Africa for it.I cannot agree with the sentiments published by Nicola. I was a lady on my own, and at NO time did I feel threatened or uncomfortable. Everyone was about their own business and the atmosphere was one of happiness and togetherness, we were all there for something special. The Police and stewards were very much in evidence, but their role seemed to be overseeing and keeping the peace, rather than active policing. Yes, one could smell pot ( or dagga as we call it ) but one got the impression the police were being tolerant and would only intervene should things got out of hand.There were bag-checks at two places along the "walk-in" and no one could take in extra large bags & checks were made for alcohol. Perhaps more stringent attention could be paid to those blatantly drinking or drugging, as of course drunks do spoil things for others, with the penalty being eviction ! The one point I would recommend was that the parking area/field is made available MUCH earlier !!!! I was one of many parked along the side of the road - waiting & waiting and generally causing major traffic jams. If the parking was opened earlier, all those vehicles could be gotten off the roads. The access to Stonehenge itself could still be 8pm or whatever it was, but at least the roads around it would not be so congested. I also feel that English Heritage could charge a small entrance fee - to go towards the beneficial changes they want to make and the general upkeep of this heritage site. Even if it was only 2-5 pounds ( x 24 000 !!! ) - why not ?? One just hopes the few dont spoil things for the majority, as it is a real treat that people are allowed to experience this lovely heritage site up close & personal !!

Regards Di

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From : Jay

Hello Kind Folk,
We'll be in UK 30 June - 11 July.
We want to spend some time in/ around/ amidst Stonehenge.
Does anyone have words to share regards any particular Vortex?
Please share, if you do.
Blessed Be,
Jay

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From : Ros Allen

I agree with Daniel Berenyi’s comment below. With a 360° panoramic view of the night sky, it’s possible stone-age people attached any number of meanings to the position of the planets. I think it more likely that stone-age people were fascinated simply by the presence of light in the night sky. Einstein described light as the one constant in the universe. And light, being constant, unchanging and never-ending, could have symbolised some form of eternal life.
In his article Hunter Gatherers, Farmers, Gods and Human Sacrifice (2005), Frank E Smitha suggests stone-age people were not able to differentiate between matter and spirit. I disagree and would argue that stone-age people knew matter and spirit to be separate entities. My own hypothesis is that the stone columns of Stonehenge are meant to symbolise the body of a person. Matter. And the spaces within the columns symbolise the space within the body which is occupied with light - the substance of eternity and of the human spirit. The rays of the sun passing through the centre of the stones every morning would therefore illustrate the continuing presence of spirit in the form of light existing within the centre of our being.
David Souden describes in his book Mysteries of the Stones and Landscape (Collins and Brown, 1997), the presence of axe like carvings on some of the stones. The shape of the axe bearing a striking resemblance to the Egyptian ankh which represented a symbol of an afterlife; and the Ancient Egyptians, remember, were building their pyramids at the same time as stone-age people were building Stonehenge. Did the two civilisations communicate with each other? Souden points out that the axe-like carvings are restricted to one column in any of the stone configurations forming the inner circle. This led him to believe stone-age people had recognised the different characteristics associated with human behaviour we now identify as left brain and right brain attributes? The left brain is associated with speech and the right brain with experience. It seems likely stone-age people regarded the aspect of the personality which favours experience as a channel for their spirit - their soul - and considered it composed of the same light that illuminates the universe and symbolises eternity. The left brain, on the other hand, is recognised as being the source of greed, envy, anger, sloth, etc.
David Kelly suggests in the Independent - Tuesday, 1 April, ‘people travelled from far and wide to visit Stonehenge because of its notoriety as a healing centre’. As a means of healing the body, stone-age people might have sought to temper the emotions as a means of purifying the body in preparation for enlightenment. Stonehenge is not unlike modern day churches. The inner circle of stones representing the sacred. And the outer circle of stones representing the profane. The space between the outer and inner circles would then constitute a space where the transition from profane to sacred, or healing, is made possible. The blue stones having been purified would have been regarded as uncontaminated by negative energy and therefore the only stones fit to form the inner sacred circle.
And just as the walls of modern day churches often carry pictures illustrating what may be called a rite of passage I.e. Pictures informing celebrants on how to prepare themselves for enlightenment, I believe the stones columns making up the outer circle of Stonehenge perform a similar function. The purpose being to enable celebrants to understand how the attributes of the left brain prevent an individual’s perception of the light of their soul within. In my book Key To The Stones, I describe how Stonehenge’s outer circle of stones provides a step-by-step guide enabling a person to reconnect with the light of their soul.

Ros Allen

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From :Faron Scott is a regular contributor.

Well, this was my 3rd Solstice at Stonehenge. As I approached at 2.45am, I couldn’t believe how busy the place was already. The weather certainly didn’t deter anyone and it seemed that a lot had probably arrived for the Solstice Eve Sunset, as the stones were accessible earlier this year.
Everyone had to go by their timepieces to tell them when it was ‘sunrise’ time, as the ever-increasing cloud cover put paid to seeing the sun come over the horizon at 4.58am. At 4am the sky looked ready to give us what we were all hoping to see, but then the leaden clouds swept slowly across and told us that just wasn’t going to be.
Numbers were up from the previous year’s celebrations, but it was quite surprising to see the long trail of people walking back to the car park at only 5.30am.
The clouds lifted shortly after and meant that the rain was kept at bay while the music and dancing continued inside the great megaliths.
It all seemed to go quicker this year, due to having to leave the stone circle at 8am. As this was earlier than last year, there seemed to be more of a reluctance for people to depart, but most of those who attended were in celebratory mood.
There seemed to be more of the solstice spirit contained within those that turned up this year. And even after being there for a 3rd time, the wonderment that I felt from my first visit is still there.
It is such a unique gathering of a wide range of people from all walks of life and it’s an experience that, in my eyes, is unparalleled elsewhere.
With that in mind, I will be back again next year, without a doubt.
Hope you all had a happy solstice and here are some pictures that go to sum up the Solstice experience.

Faron Scott (Melksham, Wiltshire)

 

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From :Cindy

My mom and I are Americans, one from California and one from Minnesota.  As birthday presents, we gave each other an 18 day vacation in England in July 2006.  We took a special off-hour tour of Stonehenge, purchased well ahead of time, where we were allowed to walk among the stones.  Neither of us are into the mystical side of Stonehenge.  But you don't have to be, to be totally awed by this monument.  It puts you in your place; my lifetime is to these giants as a gnat's lifetime is to me.  This was one of the highlights of our trip, and I thank English Heritage for its efforts to keep this treasure safe for the next twenty generations.
Cindy

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From :Laura

Hi there i'm Laura just turned 18 and i've always loved archaeology i am soon to be studying it at Lampeter...very exciting!
I visted stone henge for the first time in February, i have always wanted to see it and i was over the moon when i finally did i was dying to get out the car and get closer but then my boyfriend told me we aren't aloud to touch it or anything i was very unimpressed with that, but then again it's understandable we don't want any more grafetti on it...right?!?.
I would love to go again but i have been living in Germany all my life due to my father working in the ARMY. But thanks to my boyfriends parents' passion for archaeology they took me along!!! I told my mum how exciting it was but she just said "Laura why it's just some stones" haha well i wasn't too impressed with that but i found it facinating. I would do anything to see the ceromey just once  but unfortunatley i can not afford to go and i have no time. But one day i will be back again and again.
The whole thing is incredible, from how it was built and it's cerimonial exsistence.
Anyone who has been lucky enough to dig there i depise you, but not in the bad way, i hope to one day be an archaeologist and get close enough to just touch the stones.
Thank you for reading
Laura X x X

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From : Allerdyce Myall

question: is it possible that a river tributy use to run along side the larkhill rd as the geogrph seems to show a river course running a long side the stones and crossing the a303 and going of south east ? its allways sticks out like a sore thumb when coming up from dorset yours awaiting

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From : Daniel Berenyi

Hi There:
I always had great interest in Antiquity and ancient sites, caves etc.
Stonehenge might have been site for brutal rituals, human offerings
even cannibalism. There are a lot of human bones around as some
documentary had shown. Think of it as a miniature Colosseum -for
country folks who heard about Rome...
The speculation about celestial meanings is actually very foolish as
the circle has 360 degrees -and you may choose many position for
any celestial line up to be "meaningful" for a wishful thinker.
Our unknown past and the life of our ancestors was not about nice
equinoxes. Just look around these days to see how BRUTAL many
humanoid can be... Don't kidd yourself!
Aloha!
D.B.

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 From :Doug Somerset

It use to be free to visit Stonehenge and that's how it should have remained. These stones belong to the whole nation, and not to some money grabbing bureaucrats who's sole aim is to rip people off. There is absolutely no reason for anyone to pay to visit something that's already theirs by right. Stonehenge belongs to us. The fences should be removed, and the gift shop that sells nothing but cheap `n` nasty tacky looking rubbish should be closed down.
Best regards,
Doug

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From : Emma Hanning

Hi There,
I went to the Summer Solstice this Year (06) this is my 4th year going and I will never miss it ever!!!
I thought it wasn’t as good as last, probably down to the rain we had for about 2 hours but still glad I went though. There seemed to be not as may people this year either. Maybe the rain put the rain put them off.
I took my Grandmother for the first time, who is 67 and is still at Hippy at heart. She absolutely loved it, she has kept on at me for years to take so I did.
We are due to go to the Winter Solstice this year (22nd Dec), can’t wait!!!. We went last year for the first time and it was spectacular!!!! Hardly any people which meant you can get right in the middle of the stone ( which you can’t at the Summer ) and it makes you feel more invloved. The sunrise is a lot better as well, due to the sun being so low in the sky, got some great pictures (soon to follow). Hope people can make the Winter Solstice it’s well worth the trip and well worth bearing the cold!!!!!  Happy Solstice J
Best Regards
Emma Hanning  24 ( Essex )

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From : Faron Scott

This was my second Solstice at Stonehenge and I think that almost everything I said in my last 'review' stands true this time, apart from the weather. In 2005, the sun was visible at 4.58am and was met with cheers and whistles and the customary blowing of horns. In 2006, however, we had cloud, rain and wind to contend with. It wasn't until 5.58am that the clouds finally moved aside and gave us the sunshine that we were all waiting for. There were slightly fewer in number present for the celebrations, due to the inclement conditions that befell this year's longest day. Rain fell regularly through the night, but this did nothing to dampen the spirits of most of those who attended. Due to the late arrival of the sun that morning, a larger group was gathered in the stone circle for music and dancing. Many different instruments were to be heard and everyone was definitely in high sprits as the sky suddenly became blue and the rain clouds all but disappeared. The only thing that spoiled the celebrations was the reluctance of some people to leave the stone circle at 9am and then to see a line of security staff having to almost physically remove people. That aside, it was another unforgettable experience and I shall definitely be returning in 2007! I have some more pictures that I hope have captured the spirit of the Solstice. Faron Scott (Melksham, Wiltshire)

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From : Tony

Dear sir or madam I met a bueatiful women at the stones, I lost her and spent the all night looking for her. She was from Andover and she had ginger hair she was about twenty years old if anyone knows her please pass on my email catwease1@msn.com. Loved the night see you at the equinox. love you always love you forever. Luv Tony

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From : Hannah Phipps

Hi, I am a travel and tourism student currently working on a project about Stonehenge as a a tourist destination. I have visited Stonehenge once before however my recollection of it is rather vague. I would be greatful if anyone could provide me information relating to any of the following things:
* What made you visit Stonehenge?
* What was the tourist experience like- did you have a guided tour? Were you given a guidebook or a translated ear-set etc?
* Did it live up to you expectations
Replies please to:- phippshannah53@hotmail.com

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From : No name given...

I writing in that hope the someone can point me in the right direction to learn about the ancient kings of Celtic Cornwall. I have recently become very interested in the subject while playing the computer game known as Barrow Hill. (www.barrow-hill.co.uk) The story, set on the Autumn Equinox, is centred on a burial mound (the barrow of the title) and a decorative stone circle added to the site in the early Bronze Age. The game is set during the present day when an excavation of the site by archaeologists disturbs that which sleeps within the barrow. There is a fascinating legend that an ancient king/(or ruler) was buried (prematurely) inside the barrow tomb, while his knights guard over the site in the form of the standing stones. It's a great story, and seems very traditional, so I am wondering if the narrative continues an exiting myth, or known legend? Lastly, I heartily recommend the game to anyone interested in stone circles, megalithic sites and Celtic legends. I'm not usually a fan of computer games, but this one is gore and action free, and features a thriller-like story and lots of pagan puzzling. Any pointers to where I could look for details on the Celtic Cornish kings would be much appreciated. Also, is there really a stone circle known as Barrow Hill? My online searches have found a train yard, and a bowling green known by the same name. Not quite what i was expecting! So, should anyone have knowledge of a stone circle, with a barrow, in the South West please let me know.
Replies, please to:- Darkfallgames@aol.com

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From : Ray

I recently visited Stonehenge for the first time in 54 years, I was dismayed to find it fenced off and a charge of £5.50 to get in. I thought it belonged to the people? Also why is it intended to carry out the road project at a cost of billions, the locality has had roads in the area for hundreds f years? Ray Liverpool

If you share Ray's feelings, make them known, but direct them also to English Heritage, http://www.english-heritage.org.uk, the custodians of the site.

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From : R P Griffin

I have been very interested in the Stones for many years and have read many books on the subject. One of the things I have never seen any theories expounded is who or how did the lintels that were in position atop the uprights, become unseated, particularly as there were substantial pins holding the whole lot together. Personally I cannot believe that these mighty lintels could be moved either by throwing stones at them, or getting trees to use as levers, to try to lever them off the uprights. I am not aware of the situation regarding earthquakes/tremors in the Salisbury Plain area over the last 4000 years, but the geography of the Plain does not lend itself to earth tremors; however I could be corrected about that. Any thoughts on the subject would be gratefully received. R.P.Griffin Master Mariner

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From : Ibeth

Hello. I am a Latin American attorney who visited Stonehenge for the first time last September 23rd. This was something I had wanted to do for the past 5 years, since I have been travelling to London, however, work had always kept me within The City´s limits. Last September, I booked a tour and went to Stonehenge alone. The experience was incredible... the energy of the place... the magic in the air... Since I was travelling alone, I only took a few pictures because I had to bother people to take them for me. When I came back home, and downloaded the pictures into my laptop, I was taken quite aback... stones in my pictures reveal shapes of faces in the stones. At first I just thought it was my imagination, but more than a month has elapsed and I keep finding new faces in the stones. Finally, I decided to tell some friends about it (when you say things like these, people tend to think you are going nuts...) and they agree with me. There are several faces "incripted" in the stones. I have looked for similar comments in other Stonehenge websites, but have not found any. Has this happened to someone else? Please let me know. My personal e.mail address is dayrarojas@hotmail.com I am going back again in the middle of November and will take more pictures. Let´s see if they appear again. Ibeth

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From : Emma

I went to Summer Solstice this year (05) it was amazing. This is my and my boyfriends 3rd year going and it gets better and better each time. The sunrise couldn't have been better just perfect. I don't know if anyone remembered the sky divers that came over just at the right time of sunrise and the cheer was unbelievable. Stonehenge is such a magical place to be, it's sacred. The sound of the drums and fiddles are just electrifying, the acoustics that go around the stones is indescribable. I felt it was a good happy environment, with very few arrests and very few people climbing all over the stones. Lets keep it that way!!!!!!!!!!! I should hopefully be attending the Winter Solstice in Dec which I have never attended before, which will be a cold one but worth it. If anyone knows the set up for it (i.e times to arrive and times the stones are open) if they could post it on this forum or email me at emma.hanning@rendernet.co.uk that would be appreciated. Happy Solstice to Everyone Emma Hanning

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From : Faron Scott
This was my first Solstice and it could not have been more perfect. The weather was absolutely fantastic, a bit chilly, but above all, seeing the sun from the moment it climbed above the horizon was breathtaking. The atmosphere was magical, especially on entering the stones shortly after the sunrise. And to hear all the cheers and horns to celebrate the solstice was just something else. Alot of people left shortly after 5am, but a large group did start gathering in the stone circle at around 6am for music and dancing. The sound of drums, violin, saxophone and horns all in unison was amazing and this continued until around 9am. I must have had goosebumps from my arrival at 3am, to the moment I left at 9.15am. With so many people from all walks of life all gathered around these ancient monoliths, you could definitely 'feel' something while you were there..... It was an unforgettable experience that I don't think can be repeated, but I will definitely be returning next year. I have attached some photo's that I would very much like to share. See you all next year! Faron Scott (Melksham, Wiltshire)
See Faron's pictures on the Solstice Photo page 24.

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From : Kate
Hi Just thought I would share my thoughts on this years celebrations, myself and the friends I was with, really enjoyed this years event. I was impressed as ever how well everyone behaved was. I saw some comments on the 'yellow jackets' and wanted to say I agree, there was no arguments and although there presence was felt, there was no bad feelings what so ever. It was also nice to see the fire wardens while 'guarding' the procession, dancing along to the beat of the drums. It made us feel they where enjoying the event as much as us and made us feel as though we where also being kept safe. Thank you again. Kate

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From : Kirsty and Richard
Just wanted to share a few photo's and say what an absolutely fantastic time we had. The atmosphere was amazing and everyone was so friendly. Looking forward to next year. Kirsty and Richard

See Kirsty's pictures on the Solstice Photo page 24.

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From : David J. Freeman
After returning from this years awesome 2005 Summer Solstice at Stonehenge. Out of curiosity I watched the second part of Channel 5's programme on the recreation of Stonehenge. I do have to smile at all of the Scientific and Archaeological theories regarding the reason for the construction of Stonehenge and it's many smaller sister stone circles dotted around the UK and the rest of the world. When arriving at the designated car park opposite Airman's Corner, the first thing that always hits me is the sheer volume of people that make the pilgrimage to witness this very special event. This is my third visit to Stonehenge during the Summer Solstice, and the amount of friends and colleagues that accompany me has increased every year. The experience is special, and until you make that initial visit you do not realise the gravity of the event. In today's society we all lead very busy lives and like to keep ourselves to ourselves with little or no time for our fellow beings. This unnatural tendency has been instilled within us since birth, by government and media control/conditioning. The Solstice at Stonehenge brings out an aspect in people that nowadays is rarely seen, a true fellowship. Indeed, I myself feel part of a huge tribe at these events, part of a huge peaceful movement. Importantly, the only goal or gain for this movement, is being there, being part of the event. Social barriers are dropped, inhibitions burn away as the sun begins its journey into the summer sky. At this time you truly recognise the beauty of our fellowship with each other. Now back to the scientists and archaeologists of our world. The true answer to the mystery of the stones is right there, staring us in the face. Instead of building a mock up of Stonehenge with blocks of polystyrene, studying star charts and routing around in the ground for ancient artefacts. Look at, and be part of the mass of people attending the solstice and experience the spirit of the event, and you will find your answer. We are after all direct descendents of the builders of these great stone circles. We all carry the secrets of their creation, we are one and the same people/tribe. We haven't changed during the thousands of years since these great monuments were built. We all have the basic natural instincts and needs that the original creators had. The stones are there for the very reason thousands upon thousands of people attend the Summer Solstice every year, TO BELONG, TO GATHER, TO FEEL, TO BE PART. We are all one. Written by: David J. Freeman

 

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From : Joe
I just wanted to comment on this years celabrations and how fantastic everything was. I would like to say how well organised the proceedings were and how great all the staff in yellow jackets were. There were several Fire marshal walking round checking everyone was ok and that there were no fires being lit. I was asked, very politely I might add, to please put out my candle when I was sat near the stone and was told "very sorry, not trying to be a kill joy but it is for everyones safety". I have no problem at all, I respect the rules and appreciate being treated like an adult and not having orders barked at me like they could have been. The weather was perfect, the food was great, the fires to keep everyone warm where appectiated. So a big thank you for making a wonderfull day and night. Joe

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From : Paul and Karen
Enjoy the solstice for whatever reason you are going. In a world where the traditional church and governments of all persuasions have failed miserably, is it any wonder that people are curios, at the very least, in the old ways once again. I agree that the stones should not be climbed upon for reasons of respect, but do the authorities really think that we could hurt them after so many thousand years. Have fun and enjoy and maybe we will see you there. Paul and Karen

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From : steviez
hiya just wanted to say that having followed the troubles that stonehenge had in the 70's-80's and the reputation for trouble that the site had at that time and now having visited stonehenge on every solstice night for the past few years i find the whole thing very moving and very friendly with people from all walks of life mixing together in a peaceful atmosphere if you havent been its an experience not to be missed and im neither religious or anything else but the experience is fantastic and the funny thing is being an english heritage member i cannot get inside the cordon if i visit during normal opening times but if you go to the solstice you are amongst the stones and can touch and feel the atmosphere one of the more unreal sights is seeing the bard? druid leader on his mobile phone as the sun comes up !! lol please find enclosed a pic from the summer solstice thanks steviez

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From : Nicki
Hi, me and my partner handfasted at Avebury several years ago during a BDO spring equinox ceremony and it was a very important moment for us, in the perfect setting. We plan to marry "legally" at some point but as we cant do that at a place that is so in keeping with our feelings it has been put on a backburner til we can "be bothered"! We have been to the solstice at Stonehenge for several years on the trot, we take our daughters who also thoroughly enjoy it. They go back to school and tell the teachers all about it and everyone makes a big fuss and thinks its "cool"! They feel safe and honoured to be able to attend at this time of year. We treat it as a special time and take the girls' out of school for a few days and go to a camp site. Other religions are allowed to practice their faith and celebrate so why as pagans, shouldnt we? We love the atmosphere and the great many types of people converging on this ancient site. I really do wish that only people with respect for the site and its meaning to visitors would attend though. Ifeel greatly grieved that there is a certain element who only attend to get drunk, throw-up and cause trouble. They are very few but the ones who will ultimately ruin it for us folk who feel the draw of the stones deep within. I love being able to wonder freely amongst the stones and feel their vibrations. I think its sad that I could visit at any other time and pay a fair old whack, considering how much it would cost for 2 adults & 4 kids, but I wouldnt be able to get close to the stones like I can on the solstice morning. I want to express my deep thanx to all those people who make Stonehenge Solstice celebration possible each year. I am very grateful for the facilities that are laid on, like the free parking, and the toilets, the help centre and to local police who help to give me a sense of safety and whose sympathetic presence stops some people getting too silly and spoiling it for all. Long may it continue!!!!!
Nicki

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